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Daily Nisaab Prices

12 October 2019 / 13 Saffar 1441
Nisáb = R6399.16
Silver = R10.45/g (R325.02/oz)
Gold = R830.33 /g (R22 427.75/oz)

Prices & Calculations include VAT

What is the meaning of Nisáb?

Nisáb is a minimum amount of wealth which makes one liable to pay Zakáh. The person who possesses an amount equal to or greater than this specified minimum wealth, which remains in his or her possession for a period of one year is considered wealthy enough to pay the Zakáh.

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Latest Inspiring Stories & News

Latest News
02 October 2019

SANZAF Third Pillar Building Project : Property Purchase and Development

SANZAF has for the last 45 years operated to Give Hope to those less fortunate by ensuring the effective and efficient collection and distribution of Zakah. We have concluded a sale agreement to acquire  the property at 3 Thornton Rd which is adjacent to our current office in Thornton Road.  This is strategic for SANZAF as it allows SANZAF to easily extend its operations from its adjacent facility.  Furthermore, it will allow SANZAF to consolidate its operations in the Western Cape from an iconic site that is well known, centrally located and accessible. The consolidation of its operations will save costs and could optimize SANZAF’s other property assets for future income-generation to sustain its operations and projects.

For more information on this project, the “Third Pillar Building Project” please click on http://www.sanzaf.org.za/proposal/

To contribute any amount or as Sadaqah Jariyah Donate Here

Please note Sadaqah and Lillah only

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Port Elizabeth
02 October 2019

SANZAF takes 120 elderly recipients to Happyvalley as part of Muharram program

On 30 September 2019, SANZAF treated 120 of its elderly recipients from Port Elizabeth and Uitenhage, to a trip to Happyvalley beach front in Summerstrand. This was the third initiative from SANZAF`s Muharram program for recipients in celebration of the new Islamic year. Other initiatives include a skills development program for Madressah children and a youth empowerment camp. In this initiative SANZAF provided transport, breakfast, lunch and a cosmetic hamper worth R250 each for all the recipients. The program commenced at 9 o`clock and ended at 14h00. This program included a presentation from Diabetes South Africa. The recipients were taught how to prepare balanced and healthy diets as well as exercising techniques that keep the body strong enough to prevent Diabetes from escalating into vital organs. SANZAF annually offers opportunities like these to recipients to equip under resourced communities. 

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Durban
02 October 2019

Latest Durban Events Calendar October 2019

October 2019

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Latest News
30 September 2019

support SANZAF Imam Empowerment Project

No other job on this Earth is more rewarding in the eyes of Allah than that of an Imam (leaders). He works 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at the behest of the community who comes knocking at his door during the early morning hours and late in the evenings. The Imam is the most underpaid profession in the Muslim Community, yet, like the rest of us, he must see to the household expenses whilst raising a family as well.

The South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF) in partnership with The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) is proud to announce the launch of the Ta’awun Imamat Programme (Imam Assistance Programme) that aims to ensure that imams earn a living wage aligned with their qualifications and experience whilst empowering the community.

Three Imams and their committees have been chosen to pilot this project and will be paid a salary from the Imam Assistance Fund account. This account is managed by SANZAF, who produce annual audited statements.

The Programme aims to:

  • Provide a living salary to Imams from areas in and around the Western Cape where the respected regional masjid committee does not have the resources to provide a monthly salary to the Imam.
  • A medical aid (Hospital Plan).
  • UIF
  • Providing financial stability for the Imam so he may focus completely on servicing his community in which he is employed and therefore providing an added benefit to that community.

Your contributions will go a long way in sustaining this long awaited initiative. Please help us #GiveHope by supporting the Imam Ta’awun Programme.

Contact 021 447 0297 for more information.

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Gauteng
26 September 2019

SANZAF BOOK DRIVE

The SANZAF EDUCATION WAQF BOOK DRIVE aims to make reading books available to children in the Paledi Village in Polokwane.

To date, SANZAF has sponsored 170 books to the Paledi Drop-in Centre (PDC). Apart from receiving a healthy meal and help with their homework, the 80 children who attend the centre daily are now able to benefit from the library’s resources.

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Western Cape & Boland
25 September 2019

SANZAF Western Cape hosts Wellness Day

On Tuesday 10th of September 2019, SANZAF hosted a wellness day for the elderly and welfare recipients at their Bridgetown Office in Cape town. Over 40 individuals received blood sugar tests, blood pressure checks and foot care treatments. Most importantly attendees received advice and health education from medical professionals.

Advocacy programmes like this are part of SANZAF’s commitment to the assisting the elderly who are too often forgotten in our communities.

For more information or to find out how you can get involved, call us on 021 6378 5108 or email communications@sanzaf.org.za

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Port Elizabeth
25 September 2019

SANZAF provides local Madressah’s with gift and grocery packs in celebration of the new Islamic year

As the month of Muharram heralds the dawn of the new Islamic year, so too it is a special time for Muslims around the world. Just as it is associated with giving, taking stock of ourselves and where we are going spiritually it is also a time of joy and mercy. The month of Muharram is one of the four sacred months which is ushered in by fasting especially the first ten days, which are resplendent with spiritual reward. In line with the hadith by Tabarani and Al-Bayhaqi in which it reported that Nabee Muhammad (SAW) said: “One who generously spends on his family on the 10th of Muharram (day of Ashura), Allah will be generous on him for the entire year.” SANZAF reached out to our Madressahs in celebrating the significance of this special month by distributing 100 food packs to five of the Madressah’s supported by the PE office on 10 and 11 September 2019. Learners attending the Madressah`s had the opportunity of enjoying some fruit, party packs and received sufficient groceries for the rest of the month. The Madressah`s benefitting from this initiative are based in Marikana, Motherwell, Kwazakhele and New Brighton. This forms part of a number of initiatives implemented annually by the Port Elizabeth office of SANZAF in celebration of the new Islamic year.

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Blog
20 September 2019

Yes, we are Uyinene

A tribute to Women’s Month

ATTACKS by men on women – an endemic problem in our society widely condemned by our ‘ulama and public figures – has shot to prominence due to the particularly tragic homicide of University of Cape Town student, Uyinene Mrwetyana.

Mrwetyana, a bubbly 19-year-old first year film and media studies student, went to the Clareinch post office to inquire about a parcel, but was told by the accused – a 42 year old clerk with a criminal record – to come back later because the electricity was off.

She returned, and the clerk now alone at the post office, assaulted and raped her. According to the police, her spirited resistance caused him to bludgeon her to death. He later burnt and dumped her body at Lingelethu West in Khayelitsha.

Uyinene’s horrifying demise had been preceded by the cold-blooded shooting of 25 year-old champion boxer, Leighandre Jegels, by an ex-boyfriend (who had a restraining order against him), and Meghan Cremer, an avid horse rider, killed by three men known to her who tied her up and stole her car.

Uyinene’s brutal murder awoke the nation, reeling from gender violence, into an unprecedented outpouring of anger and grief. A march to parliament saw police minister, Bheki Cele, booed by an impassioned crowd when he tried to address it.

For South African women traumatised by violence, Uyinene’s killing has proved to be the final straw – and the gauntlet has been thrown to government to act with real purpose and genuine political will.

South African Police Service figures reveal that in 2017-18 one woman was killed every three hours. And if that statistic doesn’t jar enough, 15.2 women out of every 100 000 will be killed in South Africa this year.

The World Health Organisation has our murder rate of women at 4.8 times higher than the global average, and out of 183 countries, we are fourth on the league of shame – only after Honduras, Jamaica and Lesotho.

For NGOs, such as SANZAF – which have to deal with the social fallout of violence against women all the time – socio-economic factors are obviously part of the problem, though there can never be an excuse for gender violence.

Tragically, much of our gender violence brews in deprived environments. Angry, hungry and unemployed males, emasculated by their lack of skills, a lack of education and crippled by economic despair, are very often perpetrators. Due to their low self-esteem, violence creates the only power dynamic they know.

Sadly, the latter is not just confined to the poor. Gender violence can be a middle-upper-class thing too, the recent convictions of sociopathic wife-killers Jason Rohde and Rob Packham in Western Cape courts, an established case in point.

However, there can be no doubt that of the 28 000 interventions by SANZAF’s 46 case workers last year, a significant percentage would have found their origins in what we have already discussed.

Of course, whatever I say cannot lift the very real grief and calm the justifiable fury so many South Africans are feeling right now. But it is in such moments of darkness that I become grateful to know Islam – not in the patronising sense of thinking it makes me better than anyone else, no. That is not the case.

Rather, my consolation is in the sense that our history shows us how gender violence and gender apartheid were abolished by the Prophet Muhammad (SAW). By changing perceptions on women through his wise actions, the Prophet (SAW) ensured that women did not have to be victims.

He forbade the practice of female infanticide practiced by the Arab tribes, especially in times of drought. This cruel custom of burying baby girls alive, so that there could be more boys, came to an end in the 7th century. The Prophet (SAW) also prohibited the social isolation of women during their haid, or monthly courses.

Then the Prophet (SAW) broke the patriarchal mould, and all the stereotypes, by not only working for a business woman, Sayyidah Khadijah, but marrying her after she had proposed to him as an older woman. This would set the trend later on when women would play a central, and affirming, role in the development of Islam.

For instance, the Sunnah of the Prophet (SAW) would drive out the notion that women had to play specific roles in society when he did his own housework. Wives are the truest witnesses to exactly whom their men are, and Sayyidah A’ishah once said in response to a question that at home, the Prophet (SAW) embodied the Qur’an.

The Prophet (SAW) used to comfort the slave women of Madinah and Makkah. And at a time of great stress – when the Companions were angry with him after he signed the Treaty of Hudaibiyya – it was his wife, Umm Salama, who consoled him, and gave him the advice that broke the impasse.

When it came to war, it was Nusaybah bint Ka’b, a nurse who took up a sword to defend the Prophet (SAW) at Uhud, who became one of Islam’s fiercest battle commanders. In the field of knowledge it was Hafsah, another wife of the Prophet (SAW), who was entrusted with keeping the first compilation of the Qur’an.

There are just so many shining examples of how women were at the forefront during the establishment of Islam, contributing economically, socially, militarily and academically. This is what always gives me hope. Allah tells us in the Qur’an that women are the partners of men, and that men are the partners of women, and that men and women are equal before the Divine Court.

And as I conclude this, there is a consoling image in my mind. It is of a radiant Uyinene, freed from her earthly bonds and liberated from her injustice, being reassured by the Prophet (SAW) that all is going to be fine.

 

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HOPE
[hohp] noun, verb

The true foundation of hope is the good that we do in this life.
(see also: ‘believe’, ‘courage’, ‘I can do this’)
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