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Daily Nisaab Prices

11 December 2019 / 03 Rabi-Ul-Akhir 1440
Nisáb = R5045.85
Silver = R8.24/g (248.56/oz)
Gold = R645.93/g (R17 440.39oz)
Prices & Calculations include VAT

What is the meaning of Nisáb?

Nisáb is a minimum amount of wealth which makes one liable to pay Zakáh. The person who possesses an amount equal to or greater than this specified minimum wealth, which remains in his or her possession for a period of one year is considered wealthy enough to pay the Zakáh.

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Latest Inspiring Stories & News

Port Elizabeth
12 December 2018

Sanzaf provides monthly groceries for recipients in Port Elizabeth

The Department of Social Development has published several reports which characterise the Eastern Cape as the second province with high rates of food insecurity in the Country. Various welfare organisations and NPO`s strive to provide assistance to communities which are affected by food insecurity to help overcome this situation.

For over thirty years the Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth has been providing groceries to its recipients on a monthly basis in an effort to eradicate food insecurity. Recipients who benefit from this initiative are from low income households therefore they struggle to support themselves and their families with sufficient groceries that can sustain them for a month period. Predominantly pensioners and recipients with health challenges benefit from this initiative. On the 4th and 5th of December 2018 the Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth distributed 45 food parcels to recipients residing Port Elizabeth.

The food hampers will assist the recipients and their families with adequate food supply for the rest of the festive season. The Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth supports 105 recipients with food hampers in PE and Uitenhage. The areas where recipients who benefit from this initiative come include Arcadia, Missionvale, Bloemendal and Jacksonville.

Through support from current and prospective donors the Sanzaf office in PE aims to sustain this initiative to ensure that recipients from low income households receive adequate food supply.

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Blog
10 December 2018

An oak tree falls: SANZAF pioneer Shaykh Yusuf da Costa passes on

ONE of the co-founders of SANZAF, Shaykh Yusuf da Costa, passed on last week after a long illness. He was aged 83. An educator of renown, a wise leader, a political activist, a da’ee, a respected scholar, an author, a keen historian and a towering human being, he has left a huge gap in our community.

Born in 1935 in Salt River, he matriculated from Trafalgar High School in 1952 and enrolled at Hewatt Teacher’s Training College. He first taught classes at the Salt River Muslim School in Kipling Street, later transferring to Livingstone High in Claremont after completing a Bachelor’s degree in History and Geography.

A member the Non-European Unity Movement, he was cut from the same political cloth as Dullah Omar, South Africa’s first post-apartheid Justice Minister. But when it came to faith, he was uncompromising on its centrality, insisting that Livingstone learners be allowed to attend jumu’ah.

Whilst teaching, Shaykh da Costa studied Arabic and the Islamic sciences and went on to earn a doctorate in the field of Geography. He became the principal of Crestway Senior Secondary in Retreat in 1967. Crestway was the first ‘coloured’ school to offer Xhosa as a subject.

In 1987, he joined the Faculty of Education at the University of the Western Cape, where he became Associate Professor and Head of Didactics until his retirement in 1996. A stalwart of Islamic education, he served as rector of the now defunct Islamic College of South Africa (ICOSA), before moving on the International Peace College (IPSA).

A measure of his integrity is revealed by former colleague, Dr Auwais Rafudeen, who tells the story of salary negotiations in a financially testing time for the college. Aware of this, Shaykh Yusuf – worth infinitely more than what IPSA could offer – said he would accept whatever remuneration it could afford. After payday, he would then donate his salary back to the institution.

His interest in Geography and History imbued him with a unique skill to understand our history, about which he was passionate. Together with Dr Achmat Davids and Prof Suleman Dangor, he penned the iconic Pages from Cape Muslim History in 1994, and conducted ground-breaking research on a host of historical topics. 

In 2000, Shaykh Yusuf became a khalifah of the Naqshbandi Muhammadi, building mosques, educating imams and bringing Islam to thousands of people in the townships

Decades earlier, his compassion for the poor – and interest in Zakah as an agent of change – had been piqued by the fact that it was being dubbed the ‘forgotten pillar’ of Islam, despite it being a vehicle for poverty alleviation. During apartheid, he saw the need for the community to have access to welfare, at a time when Muslims were regarded as unworthy second-class citizens.

In 1975, together with Shaykh Faaiq Gamildien, he founded the South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF). Today, SANZAF has become an iconic institution, offering relief and uplifting – with dignity – hundreds of thousands of people.

Claremont Main Road Mosque imam, Dr Rashied Omar, writes that Shaykh Yusuf’s “sterling work among the poor resonated with his inspirational and radical views” on the third pillar of Islam. In his Preface to an English translation of the renowned Arabic text, Fiqh al-Sunnah on Zakah by Sayyid Sabiq, Shaykh Yusuf penned the following:

 “Zakah is essentially a means devised to solve the problem of poverty, and it involves taking from the rich of their property for re-distribution among the poor, and the doing of this until such time as ‘the wealth ceases to circulate between the wealthy’.

Zakah is therefore a means of bringing about socio-economic change and development; and by taking from the rich it ensures a more equitable distribution of the wealth of a country and so helps to bring about the end of the exploitation of man by man.”[1]

Towards the end of his life, Shaykh Yusuf said that it was through the Basmallah that Allah introduced us to His two most important Names, Al-Rahman and Al-Rahim. Both these Names embraced mercy, and in his senior years he found these names were a major anchor for what he did as a Muslim.

Always to the point, always compassionate, always humble and always God-fearing, Shaykh Yusuf da Costa’s passing is like that of an oak tree falling in the forest. We will all miss his presence greatly. May Allah, the Merciful, grant him Jannah, ameen.

[1] Translator’s Preface to Zakah: The Third Pillar of Islam by Sayyid Sabiq. Translated by Yusuf da Costa and published by the Muslim Youth Movement of South Africa, 1994.

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Durban
10 December 2018

Open Day at SANZAF Durban Chef School

SANZAF Durban hosted an Open Day at their Chef School on Saturday the 9th of December 2018. Interested students attended to see how the Chef Course can make an impact in their lives.The course provides students who are passionate about having a career in the food and hospitality industry but do not have the resources to enrol at other hospitality institutions. It includes six months of theoretical training and six months of practical training where students are placed at selected hotels and restaurants in Durban.

The course is recognised by the South African Chefs Association and since the first intake in 2010, has led to the full time employment of 164 students.

Pictured here are SANZAF Graduates Imraan Sithole, currently employed at Elangeni Main Kitchen and Suhayl Pochee,currently employed at Grilled Chickana Elangeni Hotel in Durban gives a demonstration to potential students at the SANZAF Chef School Open Day in Durban.

To find out more about this initiative call 031 309 6786 or email communications@sanzaf.org.za

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Port Elizabeth
04 December 2018

Sanzaf supports Jalsah for Madressah Children

Jalsah is a special occasion which is meant to appreciate the hard work and dedication Islamic children have displayed though out the year in terms of attendance and fulfilling the duties prescribed for them in their respective Madressahs. This event is hosted annually in celebration of the children`s commitment to their education.

On 25 November 2018 the Sanzaf in conjunction with the Marikana Islamic Resource Centre/Madressah hosted a Jalsah for all the children attending the Madressah. The Marikana Islamic Resource Centre is a Madressah based in Marikana Port Elisabeth it is one of the five Madressahs supported by the Sanzaf office in PE. The Madressah serves 40 children from Marikana and other neighbouring locations. Sanzaf distributed 40 new clothing items such as brand new shoes, kurtas, Jubbahs for girls and boys attending the Marikana Resource Centre.

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Durban
25 November 2018

SANZAF Supports 16 Days of Activism

16 Days of Act Progr Rashida Patel

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Blog
22 November 2018

An international perspective on Zakah from Turkey: meeting the challenges of our times

IT is always interesting to see things from different perspectives in foreign environments. Our existing ones are either challenged or refreshed. It’s like looking down on the earth from the aeroplane window 30,000 feet in the sky, as opposed to being on the ground.

For instead of standing on the riverbank and viewing a stretch of water, we are able to see its full scope, as its snakes between valleys and meanders on to wide plains.

Recently, I spent a few days in Istanbul at a conference. And whilst the event had nothing to do with Zakah, it did get me thinking. This is because Turkey – the former seat of the Ottoman Empire which ruled for over 400 years – is rediscovering its Islamic mojo.

My brief here is not the socio-political landscape, which is complex, but how Islamic institutions, such as Zakah, have fared. I was keen to do some mental arithmetic because Turkey, boasting the world’s 17th biggest economy and 75 million people, has tremendous potential in terms of unlocking Zakah as a tool of poverty eradication.

Zakah in Turkey, I was told, has always been regarded as a personal issue, even by the Ottomans, who set up their state on the pillars of publically beneficial Awqaf institutions. Therefore, says a Thomson Reuters report of 2014, Zakah and Awqaf are deeply rooted in the cultural and religious psyche of Turkey.[1][1]

It is reported that in contemporary Turkey, Zakah has become an important source for non-governmental charity organisations. However, due to the traditionally private nature of Zakah distribution, it has not been possible to accurately measure the extent of its benefits. In recent years, the Turkish Diyanet Foundation has taken on the institutional responsibility of distributing Zakah and Zakah al-Fitr.

Three academics at Istanbul University did an analysis on the relationship between poverty and Zakah in the Turkish context last year. Firstly, they defined Zakah in current terms, and secondly, they went into technical detail – providing graphs and tables – on its potential impact.[2][2]

By definition, they argued, Zakah showed that Islam was sensitive to fair and even-handed wealth distribution. Zakah protected individuals from sickness, greed and avarice. It nurtured generosity. Zakah created the ethos of sacrifice. It cleansed the heart of impurities and it purified a person’s wealth. Zakah, they concluded, was a protection for society.

In Islam, the charitable order of priority started with close relatives, proceeded to distant relatives, neighbours and then neighbourhood residents. Zakah engendered community awareness. And in addition to funds being exchanged, there was also an exchange of love and respect.

The researchers said that social peace and harmony were created via Zakah, as its processes soothed negative feelings such as hate, resentment and hostility.

The institution of Zakah militated against the egocentric accumulation of wealth, as believers had to circulate their wealth into the economy with the understanding that the poor had a right to some of it.

The study focused on Turkish society, figures revealing that one-fifth of its households (4.7 million out of 21.6 million in a population of 75 million) were on the poverty line – a sharp contrast, incidentally, to South Africa where 55% (30 million) of our population is poverty-stricken.

One of the Turkish researcher’s tables provides some fascinating reading. In it he isolates the bottom rungs of poverty and identifies 1.4 million households. His calculations reveal that using potentially available Zakah funds, a payment of 1,307 US dollars could be made to each family. In South African currency, that would amount to about R19, 000 per family.

Interestingly, if we were to do a similar exercise in South Africa, Africa Check, a local organisation that mines facts, would give us 13.8 million South Africans at the lowest level of poverty.[3][3] If we take four as the average means for a family we get to 3.4 million households.

With South Africa being the only welfare state in Africa (just over 17 million people are recipients of state funded aid) the numbers are daunting, given that there are only 15.5 million people officially employed. However, if we look at our Muslim community, and take 4 million as our total population and calculate half-a-million (0.25%) in need of relief (41,666 households) the numbers become real.

We do not have the capacity to disburse huge amounts in terms of poverty relief like Turkey, but that should not prevent us from taking the first steps. Judicious projects in terms of human capital and education, as well as wise Awqaf investment, should become our urgent priorities to meet the pressing needs of the times.

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Latest News
19 November 2018

#CyclewithSANZAf team completes Cycle Challenge in support of Early Childhood Development

Alhamdullilah all 18 of our #CyclewithSANZAF team members completed the Telkom 947 Cycle Challenge in Johannesburg yesterday!

They rode in aid of Early Childhood Development, may the Almighty reward them abundantly. You can help us #GiveHope by contributing to our cause @ https://campaigns.sanzaf.org.za/

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Latest News
19 November 2018

Imam Ta’awun Programme: Supporting Imams to Build a better Community

No other job on this Earth is more rewarding in the eyes of Allah than that of an Imam (leaders). He works 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at the behest of the community who comes knocking at his door during the early morning hours and late in the evenings. The Imam is the most underpaid profession in the Muslim Community, yet, like the rest of us, he must see to the household expenses whilst raising a family as well.

The South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF) in partnership with The Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) is proud to announce the launch of the Ta’awun Imamat Programme (Imam Assistance Programme) that aims to ensure that imams earn a living wage aligned with their qualifications and experience whilst empowering the community.

Three Imams and their committees have been chosen to pilot this project and will be paid a salary from the Imam Assistance Fund account. This account is managed by SANZAF, who produce annual audited statements.

The Programme aims to:

  • Provide a living salary to Imams from areas in and around the Western Cape where the respected regional masjid committee does not have the resources to provide a monthly salary to the Imam.
  • A medical aid (Hospital Plan).
  • UIF
  • Providing financial stability for the Imam so he may focus completely on servicing his community in which he is employed and therefore providing an added benefit to that community.

Your contributions will go a long way in sustaining this long awaited initiative. Please help us #GiveHope by supporting the Imam Ta’awun Programme.

Contact 021 447 0297 for more information.

Donate Now

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Gauteng
19 November 2018

Gauteng hosts lunch for their graduates

On Thursday, 15 November 2018, SANZAF Gauteng hosted a graduation lunch for its entrepreneurs. The event was hosted in line with the Global Entrepreneurship Week, which takes place from 12-18 November 2018. The event was designed to celebrate the efforts of the entrepreneurs, allow them to connect with each other and to meet the SANZAF team. 32 students (past and current) and 14 staff attended the event, which also served as a graduation for the final cohort of students for the year. 12 students successfully completed the course and will go on to produce and present their personal business plans and ideas at the end of the month.

The keynote address highlighted eight habits for successful entrepreneurs and was delivered by Hoosen Essof. Five students also shared their experiences of the course and the life lessons that their own business ventures have taught them. Quraysha Mehta reminded the students that successful entrepreneurship requires hard work, dedication and trial, and error while Amin reminded his colleagues that “Allah is our first resource, not our last resort” in business, as in life.

Between February and November 2018, 51 students partook in the SANZAF Short Learning Programme in Small Business. 15 students have since started their own businesses, ranging from hair salons, takeaways, home industries, and a perfumery. The programme provides both practical and theoretical training to individuals with a penchant for business. The students attend six weeks of classes, which culminate in a Business Plan Competition where groups of students compete to design and present the best business plan. Students who successfully complete the course are awarded an NQF Level 1 certificate.

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HOPE
[hohp] noun, verb

The true foundation of hope is the good that we do in this life.
(see also: ‘believe’, ‘courage’, ‘I can do this’)
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