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Daily Nisaab Prices

23 January 2019 / 16 Jamad-Ul-Awwal 1440
Nisáb = R5113.21
Silver = R8.35/g (259.65/oz)
Gold = R662.07/g (R17 876.68oz)
Prices & Calculations include VAT

What is the meaning of Nisáb?

Nisáb is a minimum amount of wealth which makes one liable to pay Zakáh. The person who possesses an amount equal to or greater than this specified minimum wealth, which remains in his or her possession for a period of one year is considered wealthy enough to pay the Zakáh.

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Latest Inspiring Stories & News

Blog
23 January 2019

Charity is hidden but still worthy of divine accolade

HUMANITARIAN organisations will often encourage their donors to attend their outreach programmes to see how things are being done. It’s a way of proving that they are doing the job properly, and offers a unique perspective to the donor.

So whether one travels across continents to see the digging a well, or follows a local distribution of food hampers, the occasion is always instructive – if not emotionally uplifting. This is because we inevitably leave such events having been humbled by the experience.

The humility that we feel boils down to an overwhelming feeling of shukr, or gratitude; a gratitude that Allah has been kind to us, that He has bestowed upon us things such as shelter and food; and that we have not been sorely tested with qada’ and qadar – fate and pre-destiny – like those we have just visited.

The point is that we feel humbled because we have been shown the true value of our rizq – our sustenance – through what others don’t have. We feel gratitude more specifically because we quickly realise that our Creator could take everything away from us in the mere blink of an eye.

Our gratitude soon extends to the fact that we have not suffered a tsunami, a flood, a drought, a famine, a mass family bereavement or a tectonic-shifting earthquake; that we have not been struck down by warfare, socio-economic collapse or oppressive leadership like some of our neighbouring countries.

Indeed, we are given a profound life-lesson that the Creator is the Generous, the Preserver and the Powerful – that He pulls the strings of the universe. We are taught through all of this that the distribution of charity, where the right hand should not know the left, has nothing to do with the self or the ego, but everything to do with the heart – the seat of taqwa and iman (God awareness and faith).

If serving others is done for the satisfaction of the ego, then it is not charity, but simply self-aggrandisement, say the scholars. Caring and giving has to be unconditional. Therefore, it must have no strings attached. But, humanitarian activism is not easy. It is facing the frailty of the human condition with all its energy-sapping demands.

“So it’s never about your name, or your fame. You must drown your ego in the sea of mercy,” said a Shaykh to an aid worker, “drown your nafs and feel happy, especially when you get a kick up the backside.”

The importance of caring for others less fortunate than us is given context by the Qur’an, which has ordered Zakah – the purification of wealth – as a pillar of faith. By doing this, our Creator has codified communal generosity, and stripped out its conditionality and pride.

Zakah is executed not only with empathy for those who will benefit from it, but with an awareness of Allah in the presence of Allah. It is done in a state of ihsan, perfect sincerity. This is one reason why it cleanses our wealth.

Hence, it is important to note that Surat ul-Hajj (one of the chapters which mentions Zakah) concludes with a mention of Zakah. True believers, say its last two verses, must kneel and prostrate to their Lord. They must do this, for Muslims have been gifted the faith of Abraham.

The verse continues that Muslims have also been granted viceregency, which is explained as the Prophet having witness over us, so that we can have witness over mankind. In other words, the Muslim must strive for rectitude in the shadow of Muhammad [saw]. The verses conclude:

“Therefore, say your prayers regularly and pay the Zakah and hold fast to your Lord…”

Zakah is mentioned 32 times in the Qur’an, but here it is explicitly linked to faith in action. And what’s more, if the believer obeys these injunctions he will find in Allah, an “excellent Master and an excellent Helper”.

The next Surah, the Chapter of the Believers, immediately reinforces the previous message by saying in its opening lines that those who are humble in their prayer, and those who pay the Zakah, will ultimately be the heirs of Paradise.

And whilst Zakah and charity is executed without fanfare and without a need for public recognition, it does get the ultimate accolade in the eyes of Allah, for as verse 94 in the Chapter of the Prophets declares:

“He, who does good works while he is a believer, shall not see his efforts disregarded, We record them all…”

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Latest News
21 January 2019

FEEDBACK: SANZAF CEO REPRESENTS SA AT INTERNATIONAL ZAKAH CONFERENCE

The World Zakah Forum was established as a platform to formulate effective solutions to the multi-faceted issues facing the Islamic World such as effective collection and distribution of Zakah, socio-economic development in Muslim communities and the empowering of the Ummah around the world. Between the 5th and 7th of December 2018, the World Zakah Forum hosted their latest International Conference in Melaka, Malaysia

The conference played host to 300 attendees including 31 speakers from 16 countries, including England, Nigeria and India. SANZAF was proud to have our Chief Executive Officer, Yasmina Francke, represent South Africa on the world stage as one of the speakers. In addition to discussing the practices and environment that the South African National Zakah Fund operates in, our CEO presented on how Zakah can be aligned to achieve some of the sustainable goals set by the United Nations to be achieved by 20130.

This opportunity also allowed her to not only gain an international perspective and insight into the Zakah management practices and principles which she brought home but also gauge SANZAF on a world platform in respect of how the organisation’s approach, methodologies and even challenges compares to international best practices.

The Conference discussed various contemporary and updated topics on global zakat development. It was noted the growing role of Zakah plays in solving global poverty and inequality, and proposed new approaches utilizing the third pillar of Islam.

Based on the two-day discussions, a few of the outcomes of the World Zakah Forum were:

  • The philosophy and core values of Zakah should be strictly observed in increasing the welfare of Ummah.
  • Zakat should be considered as a complementary financial resource in the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals.
  • The World Zakah Forum calls on all its members to adopt Zakah as a critical policy instrument in socio-economic development in their respective countries.
  • Zakah centred organisations should be required to be transparent and accountable in publishing their reports to the public.
  • The World Zakah Forum reiterates its willingness to cooperate with developing countries in combating poverty through blended financing of Zakah and donation of the respective developing countries.


This memorable occasion is testament to SANZAF’s commitment to leading the way in efficient, relevant and effective Zakah collection and distribution.

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Latest News
16 January 2019

Support SANZAF WAQF Projects

What is WAQF?

waqf icons6A Waqf is a voluntary, permanent, irrevocable dedication of a portion of one’s wealth – in cash or kind – to Allah (SWT) and is often offered as a charity.
Land and buildings have frequently been given as Waqf, and used to build schools, hospitals and mosques, amongst other functions to benefit the community. SANZAF accepts monetary donations as Waqf, investing the money by for example, purchasing property or doing renovations to a masjid to benefit society.

SANZAF Orphans Waqf
Supporting the Bait Haleema Sa’diyya Orphanage

UNICEF estimates that there are 3.7 million orphans in South Africa, about half of whom have lost one or both parents to AIDS. In addition, 150 000 children are thought to be living in child-headed households. This leaves children having to fend for themselves, their younger siblings and even sickly parents. The same children are often forced to drop out of school and earn an income by any means possible.

The SANZAF Orphans’ Waqf was established in 2009 as a sustainable resource-base to support orphans and destitute children in South Africa. The waqf forms a perpetual endowment, whose capital/earnings are designated for supporting orphans.

This year SANZAF will be supporting the Bait Haleema Sa’diyya Orphanage project in providing orphaned and destitute youth with a safe and healthy environment for living and learning. The orphanage will cater for approximately 60 children and seeks to provide high-quality facilities to these orphaned children. The orphanage will consist of 10 x 6 sleeper units, each unit will have a sleep-in care giver (house mother), thereby creating a more homely, child-friendly and development-orientated environment. The orphanage will also have a common eating and homework area, although each unit will have its own kitchenet, lounge and study area.

Make a difference in the lives of children by assisting us to support Bait Haleema Sa’diyya Orphanage in Ennerdale, Gauteng, with the sponsorship of a building.

SUPPORT SANZAF WAQF PROJECTS AND #GIVEHOPE TO THOSE IN NEED AND GAIN REWARD IN THE HEREAFTER
Contribute any amount with Niyyah of Sadaqah-Jaariyah for a loved one who has passed on.

Donate Here

Cheque Handover Details

#GiveHope Monthly via Debit Order:
pdf SANZAF Debit Order Application Form (70 KB)

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Vacancies
14 January 2019

Vacancy - Sanzaf HOD of Finance

 

Western Cape Regional Office

NATIONAL HOD OF FINANCE

Taking dual responsibility for the national financial function as well as the Western Cape finance office, the NATIONAL HOD OF FINANCE will provide strategic support to the business through managing the delivery of financial and accounting services. This includes analysing financial information and ensuring its accuracy & implementation of specific financial initiatives and strategy. The NATIONAL HOD OF FINANCE will also share financial insight and business acumen to grow the business... 

  pdf SANZAF HOD OF FINANCE (27 KB)

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Blog
09 January 2019

SANZAF: travelling into the cyber future

THOSE I’ve spoken to in the ‘humanitarian sector’ all agree that in the last decade or so, it seems as if the world has gone mad.

Military coups, morally bankrupt leadership, xenophobia, Islamophobia, widespread famines, floods, droughts, riots, protests, earthquakes, super-storms, tsunamis, raging fires and geo-political conflict dominate the discourse.

And if that is not enough, the rich have got even richer, and the poor have got even poorer. Indeed, it has become a cruel and greedy world, where dictators, bankers and corporations rule, and where the promise of materialism and the fear of oppression are used to anaesthetise our higher sensitivities.

This has all exacerbated the great social divide, despite experts saying we have enough technology, food and other resources to lift billions of people out of poverty and ignorance. Never before in history has man had the tools he has at hand today for everyone to live in relative ease. And yet, the suffering and pain endures.

Some of our scholars say that humanity has gone godless and ego-mad, leading to selfishness and a lack of self-respect and belief, which in turn leads to a restless, unfocused and troubled society. However, amongst the clamour of this madness there is still good, and there are still good people and there are still good things.

I would argue that organisations such as SANZAF stand for the latter. Executing the divine injunction of Zakah – a pillar of Islam denoting the purification and redistribution of wealth – SANZAF has in the past four decades gone from strength-to- strength within a community that like so many others, has experienced increasing and urgent developmental needs.

However, times are a-changing. For as the elder generation of Zakah payers gracefully departs this earth with our good du’ahs, the donor profile is shifting to younger people with different perspectives.

Not least has been the improved financial situation of a post-apartheid, millennial generation of South African Muslims that has directly benefited from better schooling, university education and better job prospects. In other words, with education and opportunity has come more distributable wealth.

The biggest challenge facing any humanitarian organisation in our community today is how to harness this wealth whilst remaining socially relevant and economically effective. Marketing becomes absolutely critical to this process, where potential donors are distracted by so many things, especially social media, which shrinks the world to a hand-held device – the virtual global village, the digital ‘days of our lives’.

Late last year, SANZAF had a marketing ‘imbizo’ that mapped out the future trajectory of the organisation with regards to its profile and media presence. This was done in a way that ensured SANZAF would not lose its soul to crassness, or deviate in any way from its core values of delivery, compassion, hope and dignity.

The moot point is that SANZAF is not exempt from current trends. So like any humanitarian or faith-based organisation, SANZAF will find its donors of tomorrow determining their payments online on their hand-held devices, whilst they scroll daily through music, news, Qur’an, Hadith and the issues of the day. In other words, Zakah – like so many other things – will become a cyber-experience.

Most times, these consumers will be informed by short video clips, or inter-active apps, that spring to life when clicked. And in a world where we have been largely desensitised to violence and other horrors, SANZAF will have to be creative to grab attention without resorting to the noisy pornography of media sensationalism.

Indeed, the donor of tomorrow will be a discriminative, penny-wise and tech-savvy person, leaving organisations with little place to hide. This is where the legacy of SANZAF, with its reputation for public accountability, hope and of maximising compassionate outputs for each rand, will stand in good stead. The point is that these virtuous old values will never die, but that the methodologies of understanding them surely will.

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Latest News
21 December 2018

SANZAF End Of year office times

times

Please note in case of Emergency a contact number is available at your respected office.

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Port Elizabeth
20 December 2018

Sanzaf provides food and clothes for underprivileged children in Hankey

As the festive season unfolds, dress codes and diets are bound to change in accordance with the celebrations that are always associated with the summer seasons. Unfortunately those who are less fortunate do not enjoy this privilege. The Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth made a generous donation to the Tharros Child & Youth Care Centre on 14 December 2018. The Tharros Care Centre is a NPO dedicated to providing care and child development services to abandoned and destitute children between one and 12 years of age. This organisation is based in Hanky and has been providing a conducive environment for childhood development to underprivileged children for two years.

Theresa Sampson who is the founder of the Child Care Centre contact the Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth for assistance towards clothing and food for the children residing in the Child Care Centre. On 14 December 2018 the Sanzaf office delivered clothes, bedding material and food parcels at the Care Centre. The items donated by Sanzaf will ensure that the Children who are living under the Care of the Tharros Centre are well fed and clothed while they remain in an environment that is conducive for childhood development.

This donation is part of various other initiatives the Sanzaf Office in Port Elizabeth conducts contributing towards the advancement of childhood development.IMG 20181214 100313IMG 20181214 100315IMG 20181214 101052

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Port Elizabeth
12 December 2018

Sanzaf provides monthly groceries for recipients in Port Elizabeth

The Department of Social Development has published several reports which characterise the Eastern Cape as the second province with high rates of food insecurity in the Country. Various welfare organisations and NPO`s strive to provide assistance to communities which are affected by food insecurity to help overcome this situation.

For over thirty years the Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth has been providing groceries to its recipients on a monthly basis in an effort to eradicate food insecurity. Recipients who benefit from this initiative are from low income households therefore they struggle to support themselves and their families with sufficient groceries that can sustain them for a month period. Predominantly pensioners and recipients with health challenges benefit from this initiative. On the 4th and 5th of December 2018 the Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth distributed 45 food parcels to recipients residing Port Elizabeth.

The food hampers will assist the recipients and their families with adequate food supply for the rest of the festive season. The Sanzaf office in Port Elizabeth supports 105 recipients with food hampers in PE and Uitenhage. The areas where recipients who benefit from this initiative come include Arcadia, Missionvale, Bloemendal and Jacksonville.

Through support from current and prospective donors the Sanzaf office in PE aims to sustain this initiative to ensure that recipients from low income households receive adequate food supply.

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Blog
10 December 2018

An oak tree falls: SANZAF pioneer Shaykh Yusuf da Costa passes on

ONE of the co-founders of SANZAF, Shaykh Yusuf da Costa, passed on last week after a long illness. He was aged 83. An educator of renown, a wise leader, a political activist, a da’ee, a respected scholar, an author, a keen historian and a towering human being, he has left a huge gap in our community.

Born in 1935 in Salt River, he matriculated from Trafalgar High School in 1952 and enrolled at Hewatt Teacher’s Training College. He first taught classes at the Salt River Muslim School in Kipling Street, later transferring to Livingstone High in Claremont after completing a Bachelor’s degree in History and Geography.

A member the Non-European Unity Movement, he was cut from the same political cloth as Dullah Omar, South Africa’s first post-apartheid Justice Minister. But when it came to faith, he was uncompromising on its centrality, insisting that Livingstone learners be allowed to attend jumu’ah.

Whilst teaching, Shaykh da Costa studied Arabic and the Islamic sciences and went on to earn a doctorate in the field of Geography. He became the principal of Crestway Senior Secondary in Retreat in 1967. Crestway was the first ‘coloured’ school to offer Xhosa as a subject.

In 1987, he joined the Faculty of Education at the University of the Western Cape, where he became Associate Professor and Head of Didactics until his retirement in 1996. A stalwart of Islamic education, he served as rector of the now defunct Islamic College of South Africa (ICOSA), before moving on the International Peace College (IPSA).

A measure of his integrity is revealed by former colleague, Dr Auwais Rafudeen, who tells the story of salary negotiations in a financially testing time for the college. Aware of this, Shaykh Yusuf – worth infinitely more than what IPSA could offer – said he would accept whatever remuneration it could afford. After payday, he would then donate his salary back to the institution.

His interest in Geography and History imbued him with a unique skill to understand our history, about which he was passionate. Together with Dr Achmat Davids and Prof Suleman Dangor, he penned the iconic Pages from Cape Muslim History in 1994, and conducted ground-breaking research on a host of historical topics. 

In 2000, Shaykh Yusuf became a khalifah of the Naqshbandi Muhammadi, building mosques, educating imams and bringing Islam to thousands of people in the townships

Decades earlier, his compassion for the poor – and interest in Zakah as an agent of change – had been piqued by the fact that it was being dubbed the ‘forgotten pillar’ of Islam, despite it being a vehicle for poverty alleviation. During apartheid, he saw the need for the community to have access to welfare, at a time when Muslims were regarded as unworthy second-class citizens.

In 1975, together with Shaykh Faaiq Gamildien, he founded the South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF). Today, SANZAF has become an iconic institution, offering relief and uplifting – with dignity – hundreds of thousands of people.

Claremont Main Road Mosque imam, Dr Rashied Omar, writes that Shaykh Yusuf’s “sterling work among the poor resonated with his inspirational and radical views” on the third pillar of Islam. In his Preface to an English translation of the renowned Arabic text, Fiqh al-Sunnah on Zakah by Sayyid Sabiq, Shaykh Yusuf penned the following:

 “Zakah is essentially a means devised to solve the problem of poverty, and it involves taking from the rich of their property for re-distribution among the poor, and the doing of this until such time as ‘the wealth ceases to circulate between the wealthy’.

Zakah is therefore a means of bringing about socio-economic change and development; and by taking from the rich it ensures a more equitable distribution of the wealth of a country and so helps to bring about the end of the exploitation of man by man.”[1]

Towards the end of his life, Shaykh Yusuf said that it was through the Basmallah that Allah introduced us to His two most important Names, Al-Rahman and Al-Rahim. Both these Names embraced mercy, and in his senior years he found these names were a major anchor for what he did as a Muslim.

Always to the point, always compassionate, always humble and always God-fearing, Shaykh Yusuf da Costa’s passing is like that of an oak tree falling in the forest. We will all miss his presence greatly. May Allah, the Merciful, grant him Jannah, ameen.

[1] Translator’s Preface to Zakah: The Third Pillar of Islam by Sayyid Sabiq. Translated by Yusuf da Costa and published by the Muslim Youth Movement of South Africa, 1994.

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