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Daily Nisaab Prices

14 August 2018 / 02 Dhil Hijja 1439
Nisáb = R5223.43
Silver = R8.53/g (265.17/oz)
Gold = R634.65/g (R17 134.99/oz)
Prices & Calculations include VAT

What is the meaning of Nisáb?

Nisáb is a minimum amount of wealth which makes one liable to pay Zakáh. The person who possesses an amount equal to or greater than this specified minimum wealth, which remains in his or her possession for a period of one year is considered wealthy enough to pay the Zakáh.

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Latest Inspiring Stories & News

Latest News
16 August 2018

Media Release: SANZAF 2018 Audited Annual Financial Statements Release Announcement

The South African National Zakah Fund (SANZAF) is pleased to announce the financial results of its period ended 30 April 2018/14 Shabaan 1439.

“We are eternally grateful to our donors, whose support of our projects and programmes has resulted in SANZAF collecting a total of over R133 million during the reporting period, amid a challenging economic environment,” says SANZAF National Chairperson, Shauket Fakie.

Our Zakah income for this period amounted to R96 million, compared to R111 million in the previous year which, along with our Non Zakah income, enabled us to make a significant impact on the lives of the poor and needy.

The past year has indeed been one of renewed affirmation for SANZAF, as we continue to actively fulfil our mandate to effect meaningful and sustainable change through development and relief.

“We are pleased to report that the proportional distribution of total funds collected, has increased from 91.5%, in the previous year, to 98.2%. This increased distribution is reflected in our empowerment initiatives, which give credence to SANZAF’s new brand positioning of embodying hope in all we do,” added Fakie.

It is noteworthy to mention that our expenditure on the SANZAF Education, Empowerment and Development (SEED) Programme amounted to R27.7 million, which was invested in a number of initiatives ranging from bursaries for tertiary education to development projects that have enabled beneficiaries to become self-sufficient.

The Summarised Annual Review of Activities and Audited Financial Statements for 2017/2018 (1438/1439) can be viewed on www.sanzaf.org.za/about-us/audit-reports-downloads/54-summarised-annual-review-of-activities-and-annual-financial-statements-2018/file.html and the Audited Annual Financial Statements can be viewed on www.sanzaf.org.za/about-us/audit-reports-downloads/55-audited-annual-financial-statements-2018/file.html

For more information on SANZAF projects and programmes, follow us on Twitter @SANZAFSA and Instagram @sanzaf_official, like us on Facebook or visit our website at www.sanzaf.org.za

Media enquiries: Contact Sakeena Bock or Nurene Jassiem on 083 676 3979 / 021 447 0297 or email at: communications@sanzaf.org.za

Download Full Article here pdf SANZAF 2018 Audited Annual Financial Statements Release Announcement (275 KB)

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Blog
08 August 2018

Women’s month: Sayyidah Khadijah, the first Muslim to give charity

IN South Africa, women’s month – celebrated in August – is a tribute to many things. It is remembered due to the famous march to the Union Buildings on 6 August 1956 by African women protesting the passbook, and, it is an acknowledgment of the challenges women still face today, such as discrimination.

Sadly, the Muslim community is not exempt from this inherent chauvinism, and nor is it exempt from the curse of domestic violence, something that SANZAF’s field workers regularly encounter in their counselling sessions.

If we resort to the Prophetic example, there is ample evidence that most of us have forgotten just how anti-racist, and just how anti-chauvinist, the blessed Prophet Muhammad was. Apart from abolishing the bizarre and cruel Arab practice of burying infant girls, he never – ever – denied women access to Din.

This is how, for example, Nusaybah bint Ka’b, who out of concern at the casualties at the Battle of Uhud, picked up a sword and went into combat to defend the Prophet. She would go on to fight at the battles of Hunayn and Yamamah.

Together with Umm Asma bint ‘Amr bin ‘Adi she had also requested to take the ba’yah, the oath of Islam at Aqabah, face-to-face with the Prophet. It is significant that the Prophet had agreed without objection.

This, then, is just one of many accounts about the dynamic role of women in Islam, so buried and so forgotten in our history. It is ironic today that whilst some obscurantists wish to confine women to the periphery, women are centre stage: running NGOs, teaching our children, running our households and sitting as judges in our courts.

So this August it is only appropriate that we remember one of Islam’s finest figures, Sayyidah Khadijah bint Khuwaylid.

Martin Lings in his classical Prophetic biography writes that “one of the richer merchants of Mecca was a woman – Khadijah bint Khuwaylid, of the clan of Asad. She was first cousin to Waraqah, the Christian, and his sister Qutaylah, and like them she was a distant cousin to the sons of Hashim”.

She had already been married twice, and since the death of her second husband it had been her practice to employ men to trade on her behalf. That was how she had hired Muhammad, known as ‘the trustworthy one’, a reticent young man renowned for his uprightness and honesty.

Khadijah had been hugely impressed by this young man, whose gentle ways had entered her heart, enlivened by the accounts of her slave, Maysarah, of their journey to Sham where Bahira the monk had recognised the Prophet, and two Angels had shaded him from the sun.

The Prophet, blessings upon him, was twenty-five years old. Khadijah saw a man of medium stature, inclined to slimness, with broad shoulders and a proportioned body. She saw that his hair and beard were thick and black, not altogether straight, slightly curled.

But, in addition to his physical beauty, she saw that there was radiance in his face – and this was particularly apparent on his forehead, and in his warm eyes. Khadijah knew that she herself was still beautiful, but she was fifteen years older. She was an independent woman, and the thought had struck her: would Muhammad be prepared to marry her?

One of the people she consulted was Waraqah, to whom she recounted the miraculous events of the Prophet’s journey to Sham. Waraqah had confirmed to her that Muhammad would be a prophet.

Given this, Khadija’s words of proposal are astounding. She expressed no wish for status, and never referred to his prophethood, which would occur 15 years later. Instead, she referred to his character:

“Son of mine uncle, I love thee for thy kinship with me, and for that thou art ever in the centre, not being a partisan amongst the people for this or for that; and I love thee for thy trustworthiness and for the beauty of thy character and the truth of thy speech.”

What is outstanding, even today, is that Sayyidah Khadijah was not only financially independent, and older than her husband, but that she proposed to him. Following this, Sayyidah Khadijah would be the Prophet’s faithful consort for 25 years, and give birth to his four famous daughters: Fatimah, Ruqayyah, Zainab and Umm Kulthum as well as his son, ‘Abdullah, who would pass on in his infancy.

Waraqah had warned his cousin of tests to come, but she had said nothing about this to her husband. And when he had run down from Jabl Nur after the frightening experience of the first Revelation, it was to her that he had sought consolation, saying: “Cover me! Cover me!”

And indeed, it was Sayyidah Khadijah who was the first to support him; it was Sayyidah Khadijah who became the first Muslim; and it was she, together with the Prophet, who would suffer the abuse of the Quraysh and the barbs of Abu Jahl. But more significantly, is that whilst she still had wealth – before the infamous and crippling boycott of the Bani Hashim – she would be the first Muslim to give charity.

This is something for which Sayyidah Khadijah is not always given her proper due, especially in a male dominated world.

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Durban
26 July 2018

Durban Office Educating Recipients on sustainable and cost effective meals

Food security is one of the major concerns of SANZAF. Consequently, an economic survey was conducted with recipients and other relevant personnel in the region of Kwa-Zulu Natal. This survey revealed that the average income for the recipient families is between R 1500 to R 3500 and after payments of rental, electricity, water and transport, the amount available was minimal.

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Blog
24 July 2018

Qurbani, the preferred Sadaqah

QURBANI, the ritual sacrifice of a permissible animal during the Eid ul-Adha period at the end of the Hajj, is regarded as the most preferred sadaqah (or charity). When asked to explain Qurbani, the blessed Prophet Muhammad had told the Companion, Zayd ibn Arqam, it was the custom of his father Ibrahim, who was given a ram instead of his own son, Isma’il.

When Zayd had asked what spiritual benefit there was, the Messenger of God had replied that there was a reward for every single hair of the sacrificed animal. The Prophet, peace be upon him, had explained that what made the Qurbani special was that it was performed purely for the sake of Allah, and Allah alone. The Udhiya, as it is sometimes called, was accepted even before the blood reached the ground.

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Blog
09 July 2018

Please sir…can I have some soap?

Mr BumbleTHERE is a famous line in Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, an 18th century novel about the treatment of children in industrial England. Mr Bumble, the portly supervisor of a child workhouse, gets enraged when Oliver asks for some more gruel, a watery, ill-cooked broth.

“Please, sir, can I have some more?” asks a frightened Oliver, who then meets the wrath of the unfeeling Mr Bumble.

Whilst there is a long distance, historically and geographically, from Charles Dickens to South Africa, I am often reminded of this scenario when poor people knock on our door. Of course, it is a scene played out in many cities and towns throughout South Africa on a daily basis.

Some of those who knock are brazen, with a sense of entitlement, but on the other hand, there are those who are respectful – even Oliver-like – in their requests for help. For these people, just to walk up to a strange door has taken up their last reserves of pride.

Indeed, these are the souls we have to take extra care of, because they are not only begging for food, but their very dignity. We have to remind ourselves that Allah, the Almighty, can elevate – or reduce us – in the mere blink of an eye.

And as winter bites, and as the Western Cape experiences welcome rain, we have to remember that the cold weather is not a boon to the less privileged, but very often a severe setback. On the Highveld, where people have to burn things to stay warm, there are shack fires – and in the Cape as the rains come, so do the floods.

Cold, wet, hungry, homeless and shivering, the South African underclass faces many daunting challenges, challenges we ourselves would probably not be able to deal with, should we be suddenly taken out of our own comfort zones.

Think for a minute what a person hears, and sees, when they knock on your door, and you open it…the smell of food, the sound of a TV, a toilet flushing…a wave of warmth and comfort. All things they don’t have.

The other day, just as the rains had let up and the sun had broken through the clouds, a young woman knocked on our door. We had never seen her before, a sure sign that this was someone who really needed help. After the years, you get to learn the signs. The “regulars” have their routines.

She was a sweet person, desperately hungry, who told us that she lived under a nearby bridge, and that she was waiting for the social worker to find her a bed in a night shelter. Her background story was a typical one of abandonment, and lack of living space in a Cape Flats backyard. The city’s streets had been her only recourse.

She sat on our stoep to eat some of the food that that had been warmed for her, another sign of need, and loneliness. The hungriest will always eat immediately, and those collecting for families or communes will quickly scurry away.

After she’d eaten, the young lady made a request, which for some might have sounded a little odd.

“Please, sir, can I have some soap? Even if it’s an old bar.”

Given her circumstances, it was not an odd request. This was a call for self-esteem. We had gained a little of her trust, and to refuse her would be crushing. So we dug in a cupboard, and came back with a new bar of soap and some facial cream.

“Jor. It’s new stuff. Thank you, auntie!” said the woman to my wife. Her smile was worth a million dollars. For us it had been a small sacrifice, but for her it had meant the world.

Indeed, small things can teach us so much. Many years ago an old hand from an NGO had advised me to never give the underprivileged inferior goods. “Don’t give anybody something you yourself wouldn’t use,” he had told me, “never!”

Of course, SANZAF fully embraces this policy of giving the best. And in the dark moments of winter, a small thing such as a “dignity pack” (soap, shampoo, cream, toothpaste etc.) can make such a huge difference. The truism is that hope – the ultimate aim of sadaqah and Zakah – does not have to cost the proverbial arm and a leg, and that we don’t have to be a Mr Bumble.  

 

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Pietermaritzburg
02 July 2018

Adopt a granny in Pietermaritzburg brings Hope

SANZAF gives hope to the elderly of Pietermaritzburg by warming their hearts and lives with winter warmth shopping at Asmalls.

On the 5th of May, 50 grandmas and 10 grandfathers were treated to a shopping spree at Asmalls fashion retailers valued at R 1000 each.

This gives our recipients the opportunity to ensure they are equipped for the cold winter while also allowing them to personally choose their clothing.

Visit www.sanzaf.org.za or call 033 397 9133 to see how you can get involved.
#Givehope with SANZAF.

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Western Cape & Boland
02 July 2018

Holiday Programmes for Youth in Western Cape

In keeping with the Youth and Community Development SANZAF hosted Youth Holiday Programmes at four locations in the Western Cape from the 25th to 29th June providing much needed activities and guidance to youth during the school holidays. The holiday programmes took place in Bridgetown, Retreat, Elsies river and Manenberg, an area where as of last year, only 32.7% of the 6 685 young adults (between 15 and 24) from the area have completed matric, and only 15% of people in that age group are currently attending an educational institution.

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Gauteng
28 June 2018

SANZAF’s Adopt-a-granny Campaign in Gauteng

This May marked SANZAF’s (South African National Zakah Fund) fifth annual Adopt-a-granny Campaign. The project aims to allow school students to give back to their communities in a meaningful way. Students identify deserving elderly women in their communities and then treat them to breakfast and a winter-warmth shopping spree.

The project, which appreciates Islam’s concern for the elderly, allows students to learn about this important Islamic value through experience. It is thought that spending quality time with community elders will not only bring joy to the elders but also impact the way in which students view the elderly and their responsibility towards them and humanity as a whole.

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AMAL (Hope)
You can make a financial difference for those in need and give them HOPE.
HOPE
[hohp] noun, verb

The true foundation of hope is the good that we do in this life.
(see also: ‘believe’, ‘courage’, ‘I can do this’)
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